Sumernet

livelihoods - sustainable

Regional migration: A feasible option for livelihood diversification for the Mekong’s poor?

Migration is a significant issue in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), which consists of Cambodia, China (Yunnan and Guangxi), Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR), Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. International labour migration from GMS countries is steadily increasing, both within GMS countries and to other countries. The estimated number of migrants from GMS countries (except China) was over 6 million in 2004 (IOM 2008). Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar are considered to be among the world poorest countries, classified as least-developed countries by the United Nations.

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Impacts of the East-West Economic Corridor on local livelihoods and forest resources in the Mekong River region: Case studies of selected forest-dependent villages in Vietnam, Lao PDR and Myanmar (EWEC-FC)

The East–West Economic Corridor (EWEC) is an economic development program initiated in 1998 to promote development and economic integration of the four ASEAN countries: Myanmar, Thailand, Lao PDR and Vietnam.
EWEC created the first transportation corridor – operational since 2006 – running the entire width of mainland Southeast Asia with a distance of 1,450 kilometres. The EWEC contains many forest-dependent villages with a significant number of people living below the poverty line. But there is an absence of information on the impacts of EWEC in particular on local livelihoods and on other social and environmental issues.

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Producing benefits for the rural poor from good practices in rice contract farming, Cambodia

The Cambodian government is committed to increasing rice productivity and aims to soon become a major rice exporting country of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). The government could well use contract farming to boost production, as it is considered to be one of the best ways of promoting and developing more commercially-oriented smallholder rice production.

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Regional migration: A feasible option for livelihood diversification for the Mekong’s poor?

Migration is not a recent phenomenon. For centuries, people have moved across borders for economic and political reasons. Globally, there were 191 million people living outside their country of birth, or 3% of the world’s population (UN, 2005). This number has also increased further with the contribution of transport and communications to facilitating mobility. The remittances sent back home from this rising category of workers abroad have an immense impact on the living standards of people in their country of origin.

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